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Amsterdam travel essentials 

Photo by Liam Gant from Pexels

You’ve booked your Amsterdam getaway (WOOP WOOP), but what are you going to pack? These are 10 travel essentials that you must take on your trip to Amsterdam. 

  • Waterproof jacket
  • Comfortable clothing
  • Comfortable shoes
  • Travel adapter
  • Backpack 
  • Mosquito repellent
  • ID 
  • Earplugs 
  • OV-chipkaart
  • I Amsterdam City Card

Waterproof jacket 

The weather in Amsterdam is unpredictable and there are a severe lack of mountains to block any incoming depressions from the sea. On average, Amsterdam receives 700 millimetres of rainfall a year, most of which falls in November. Even if you aren’t visiting in November, it is wise to take a waterproof jacket with you just in case. A waterproof jacket will protect your clothing from becoming damp in a downpour, ensuring that you are comfortable and dry whilst you are travelling around the city. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Comfortable clothing 

Amsterdam is the denim capital and is known for its fashionable, yet comfortable, clothing. As a city break, with an abundance of must-see attractions, you will find yourself doing a lot of walking whilst you are visiting Amsterdam, so comfort is key. Take your favourite pair of jeans and a handful of tops, shirts, and jumpers (depending on the season), with you to wear. These outfits can be dressed down during the day and dressed up if you are going out in the evening. 

Photo by Zen Chung from Pexels

Comfortable shoes 

Amsterdam is not just the denim capital, but the biking capital as well. If you aren’t wandering the beautiful cobbled streets of Amsterdam on foot then you must be experiencing it by bike. Regardless of if you are biking or walking, you will need to wear comfortable shoes, such as trainers. You don’t want to be enjoying the sights of Amsterdam only to get sore feet from inappropriate shoes halfway through your day. Instead, take a pair of comfortable shoes that you know you can spend all day in.

Photo by ready made from Pexels

Travel adapter 

The Netherlands uses the Type F electrical plug, which has 2 round pins spaced 2cm apart. This is the plug commonly used in Continental Europe. When packing for your trip to Amsterdam make sure that you include a travel adaptor so that you have full use of the plugs in Amsterdam whilst you are away. You can buy a travel adaptor online or at most convenience stores. 

Photo by Markus Winkler from Pexels

Backpack 

Depending on how long you are in Amsterdam, and how lightly you can pack, you may want to avoid taking a suitcase and use a backpack instead. Amsterdam is notorious for its narrow cobblestone streets which, although incredibly pretty, can be difficult to navigate with a suitcase. Rather than struggle wheeling a suitcase, take a backpack instead. It is a much easier alternative and a great way to prevent you from overpacking. 

Photo by veerasak Piyawatanakul from Pexels

Mosquitto repellent

If you are planning a trip to Amsterdam during the months of July and August then go armed with plenty of mosquito repellent. The humidity of the summer months, coupled with the water from the canals, creates the perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes, and your blood is the perfect snack. Douse yourself in mosquito repellent every night and before you leave for the day, and you should be safe from the bloodsuckers. If not, you risk being covered in itchy red blotches for the duration of your holiday

Image by Mike Mozart

ID

In the Netherlands, everyone is required to carry some form of official identification, such as a passport or driver’s license, with them at all times. If you do not have an official form of identification and you get caught by the police you will face a fine. Carry your ID with you at all times to be safe. You never know when you might need it.

Photo by Ethan Wilkinson from Pexels

Earplugs 

Amsterdam is home to over 1 million people so the streets can get noisy. If your room overlooks a main street, particularly one with lots of bars and coffee shops on it, you could experience a lot of noise pollution at night. If you are a light sleeper, you may want to invest in a pair of earplugs to help you sleep more soundly. Simply pop them in, and drift off, ready to face a new day in the city tomorrow. 

Image by sleepsugar.com

OV-chipkaart

When you get to Amsterdam buy yourself an OV-chipkaart from the nearest railway station. An OV-chipkaart is similar to a London Oyster card. You simply put money onto your card and use it on the buses, trams, and metros around Amsterdam. This is a much faster and easier alternative to buying single-use tickets and can be used if you visit Amsterdam in the future. 

Image by DennisM2

I Amsterdam City Card 

There are so many amazing things to see and do in Amsterdam and an I Amsterdam City Card can help you see and do them all. An I Amsterdam City Card can be purchased for 24, 48, 72, or 96 hours, and gives you unlimited use of public transport, free entry to over 60 museums and attractions, free canal cruises, and discounts in certain shops, restaurants, and theatres. With prices starting at just €59, an I Amsterdam City Card is the perfect travel essential for those looking to see a lot of Amsterdam in a short amount of time. 

Image by Norio NAKAYAMA

Whilst you’re packing your Amsterdam travel essentials, we’ll be laundering the rest of your clothing. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Top tips for getting back to work 

The Christmas decorations are down, the festive food has been eaten, and the new year has well and truly begun. Your first day back at work is looming and it seems like Christmas was only yesterday. Don’t worry though, because these tips will have you feeling ready to get back to work in no time. 

  • Get organised 
  • Wear your mood
  • Schedule your time for you
  • Set goals 
  • Eat happy 
  • Catch up with your colleagues 
  • Try to keep a positive attitude 
  • Give yourself a break 

Get organised 

As the saying goes: fail to prepare, prepare to fail. The evening before your first day back at work get everything you need for the next day organised. Think about what you are going to wear and make sure that each item is freshly washed and ironed. Pack your bag, making sure that you have everything you need, including a spare charger, keys, purse, etc. This will prevent a mad rush to find missing items in the morning. Finally, make sure that you have breakfast provisions. Even if your breakfast is a coffee and a breakfast bar, make sure that you have the essentials in. Even if you are working from home it’s important to be organised the night before your first day back as it will help you get back into a working mindset. 

Photo by Adrienne Andersen from Pexels

Wear your mood

Whether you are working from home or back in the office, wearing your mood will make your first day back at work a lot more enjoyable. Whether you want to dress in a colour that makes you happy, wear a piece of jewellery you received for Christmas, or wear an outfit that makes you think of a fond memory, wearing something that makes you smile will make your first day at work a little less painful. 

Photo by RF._.studio from Pexels

Schedule your time for you

It can be overwhelming going back to work after an extended period of time off, so it’s important that you schedule your time. Rather than scheduling a week full of meetings and catch-ups, schedule your time for you. Use your first day back as a way to ease in to your workflow. Blocking out time to look through your emails, catch up on projects, and evaluate what there is to do. Your first day, or even your first week, back at work may not seem very productive, but it is a great opportunity to reorganise yourself, and your time, ready for the year ahead.  

Photo by Bich Tran from Pexels

Set goals 

During your first day, or week, back at work think about what you want for the upcoming year. You may have made personal new years resolutions, but what about your professional ones? What are your professional goals for this year and how are you going to achieve them? You won’t be able to get back into the flow of work without knowing what goals you are working towards achieving, so use your time wisely to think about what you want. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Eat happy 

They say that you are what you eat, so eating happy will make you happy. By eating happy, we mean eating food that makes you feel good. This should be food that is nutritious, balanced, and, above all, tastes amazing. Eating a well-balanced and nutritious meal will keep your energy up throughout the workday. You may also want to make your plate as colourful as possible as looking at bright and vibrant colours is proven to make us feel happier. 

Photo by joost van os from Pexels

Catch up with your colleagues

On your first day back at work make time to catch up with your colleagues. It may feel like you have so much to do that you don’t have time to catch up, but it’s important to make time to socialise with the people you work with and show an interest in their lives outside of the office. Schedule a coffee break with your work friends, even if just for 30 minutes, to catch up on what they’ve been up to and share holiday anecdotes. You can even share your first-day back stresses.  You, and your colleagues, will feel a lot better afterwards.

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

Try to keep a positive attitude  

Going back to work can be incredibly stressful and overwhelming. It’s much easier said than done, but on your first day back, try and keep a positive attitude. Focus on the positives of going back to work, such as seeing colleagues and getting back in to a routine, rather than the stressful aspects. This will help to keep your stress levels low, and help you manage your workload better. Just remember that the first day back is hard for everyone, so a positive attitude can brighten your day as well as everyone else’s. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Give yourself a break

The most important thing to remember when getting back to work is to give yourself a break. Accept that you will have a lot to catch up on, but won’t be as productive as you many want to be. Give yourself time to ease back into your routine, catch-up with colleagues, and think about what you want from the upcoming year. Start your year at work off right by being kind to yourself. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Whilst you get back to work, we will tick laundry off of your to-do list. To book your Laundryheap order head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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The 5 stains of Christmas- the dessert edition

Photo by Tim Douglas from Pexels

Once you have filled yourself with Christmas dinner, almost to the point of explosion, there is only one thing left to do- eat dessert. If you get a dollop of dessert on your Christmas outfit, don’t worry, because this handy guide will help you to remove the stain. 

  • Brandy butter
  • Mincemeat 
  • Double cream
  • Jelly 
  • Toffee sauce

Brandy butter 

Brandy butter is the perfect accompaniment to your Christmas dessert, especially if you’re having a Christmas pudding. Its combination of butter and alcohol though makes it a tricky stain to lift.  

To lift your brandy butter stain you will need…
  • Dull knife or spoon 
  • Talcum powder, baking soda, or cornstarch 
  • Soft-bristled brush
  • Heavy-duty liquid detergent 

To begin lifting your brandy butter stain use a dull knife or spoon to remove as much solid butter as possible. Be careful when doing this as pushing too hard could result in pushing the stain further into your garment. 

Once you have removed as much solid butter as possible, cover the stain with talcum powder, baking soda, or corn-starch. Brandy butter stains are oil-based, and fine powders, such as talcum powder, can absorb oil quickly. Make sure that your full stain is covered by the powder, and leave it for 15-30 minutes. After 15-30 minutes, shake off as much of the powder as you can. 

Next, use your fingers or a soft-bristled brush to work a small amount of heavy-duty liquid detergent into the remaining stain. Make sure that you are covering the whole of your stain with the detergent, and using a gentle scrubbing motion to ensure that your stain is being penetrated. 

Finally, after working the detergent into your stain, launder your garment as you usually would. Check that your stain has been completely lifted before drying your item. If it hasn’t then repeat the process. 

Image by christmashat

Mincemeat  

Mince pies are a Christmas staple. Sticky mincemeat filling, encased in a beautiful buttery pastry makes for the perfect after-dinner treat. If you drop mincemeat filling down yourself, follow these simple steps. 

To lift your mincemeat stain you will need…
  • A spoon or blunt knife
  • White vinegar 
  • Clean cloth
  • Washing powder 
  • Warm water
  • Sponge 

To begin lifting your mincemeat stain use a blunt knife or spoon to remove as much of the mincemeat as possible. Be careful when doing this as mincemeat is incredibly sticky and can easily spread to other parts of your garment. 

Once you have lifted as much mincemeat as possible, pour a small amount of white vinegar on to a clean cloth and gently dab at the remaining stain. White vinegar contains a mild amount of acetic acid which is strong enough to lift stains without causing damage to your clothing. Continue dabbing at your stain until it has lightened in colour. 

Next, mix 1 teaspoon of powder detergent to a mug of warm water and mix thoroughly until the powder has dissolved. Use a sponge to gently dab the detergent mixture on to your remaining stain.

After you have dabbed your stain, wash your garment as your usually would. Before drying, check that your stain has been completely lifted. If not, repeat the process. 

Image by Amanda Slater

Double cream 

If you are not a fan of brandy cream, double cream is the perfect accompaniment to your Christmas dessert. Be careful though, because it is very easily dripped. 

To lift your double cream stain you will need…
  • Clean cloth
  • Cold water 
  • Heavy duty liquid laundry detergent
  • Soft bristled brush 

To begin removing your double cream stain use a clean cloth to soak up as much of the cream as possible. Carefully blot at the cream using your cloth, making sure that you are blotting and not rubbing as this will set the stain further into your garment. 

Next, flush out the remaining stain by holding it under a cold running tap with the underside of your fabric facing up. The constant stream of cold water will push the protein molecules from the fibres of your clothing, ultimately lifting the stain. 

After flushing your stain, wash your garment as you usually would. Before drying check that the stain has been completely lifted. If it has not, fill a sink with cold water and add a teaspoon of heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent. Place your stained item in the water, making sure that it is completely submerged, and leave it to soak for at least 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, remove your garment from the water and wash it again. If your double cream stain still has not been lifted, repeat the process. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer

Jelly  

Sometimes after a big Christmas dinner you just want something light for dessert, like jelly. Eat with caution though as this wibbly wobbly dessert can easily fall from your spoon and straight on to your lap. 

To lift your jelly stain you will need…
  • Dull knife or spoon
  • Cold water
  • Clean sponge 
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Oxygen based bleach 
  • Tepid water 

To begin lifting your jelly stain, use a dull knife or spoon to scoop up as much of the jelly as possible. Be extra careful when doing this as you don’t want your jelly to fall off of your utensil and back on to your clothing

Once you have removed as much jelly as possible, flush the remaining stain by holding it under a cold running tap. Make sure that your water is nothing warmer than cold as jelly stains are protein based and any warmer water will cook the protein, making the stain harder to lift. 

After flushing your stain, use a clean sponge to gently dab rubbing alcohol onto the area. The rubbing alcohol will help lift the remaining stain. Continue dabbing your stain with the alcohol until it has completely lifted. Once it has been lifted, wash your item as you usually would. 

If, after a while of dabbing, you notice that your stain is not getting any lighter, mix a solution of oxygen-based bleach and tepid water. Completely submerge your garment in the water for a minimum of 4 hours. The oxygen-based bleach will penetrate your stain, removing the artificial colouring and leaving your garment stain-free. After 4 hours, remove your clothing from the water and wash as you usually would. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional P

Toffee sauce

A sticky toffee pudding would not be complete without it’s deliciously sweet toffee sauce. Unfortunately, a toffee sauce stain is quick to dry, so to remove it you have to act fast. 

To lift your toffee sauce stain you will need…
  • Dull knife or spoon
  • Borax
  • Cold water
  • Heavy duty liquid laundry detergent 
  • Hot water
  • Hydrogen peroxide or white vinegar 

To begin lifting your toffee sauce stain, first use a dull knife or spoon to lift as much of the sauce as possible. Be careful when doing this as pushing too hard will cause the stain to set further into your garment. 

Next, mix a paste of 1 tablespoon of water with 3 tablespoons of borax. Spread this paste over your stain, making sure that the whole area is covered. Leave your garment to sit for 15-20 minutes, giving the borax adequate time to penetrate your stain and lift the sticky toffee sauce from the fibres of your clothing. After 15-20 minutes, rinse your garment thoroughly, making sure that all of the borax paste has been removed. 

Once you have removed all of the borax paste, rub a small amount of heavy duty liquid laundry detergent directly onto your stain. Use your fingers to work the detergent in to your stain, saturating the area with detergent. Leave your garment for a minimum of 5 minutes, before flushing your stain, and detergent, with hot water. Make sure that the water is as hot as possible as this will help push the stain from your clothing. 

If your stain has been removed, or is significantly lighter, wash your garment as you usually would. If it has not been removed, use a sponge to gently dab a small amount of hydrogen peroxide or white vinegar on to the stained area. This should only be done on white or colour-fast clothing to avoid bleaching and ruining your garment. Continue to blot until your stain has lifted, and then wash your item as you usually would. 

Image by Sean MacEntee

Christmas is for spending time with loved ones, not doing your laundry. Give yourself a well deserved Christmas break and book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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How to limit your laundry load

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

The less time you spend doing laundry the more time you can spend doing the things you enjoy. Limit your laundry load with these handy hacks. 

  • Sort through your clothing
  • Wait until your laundry basket is full
  • Spot clean clothing 
  • Hang towels 
  • Air clothing 
  • Know how frequently items need to be washed 
  • Treat clothes appropriately
  • Use Laundryheap 

Sort through your clothing 

The easiest way to limit your laundry load is by sorting through your clothing and getting rid of any items that you don’t wear. Ask yourself: when was the last time you wore the item? Does it still fit properly? Would you miss it if you were to get rid of it? If the clothing that you decide to get rid of is in good condition, donate it. Clearing out your clothes is a great way to limit your laundry load and help those in need. 

Photo by Liza Summer from Pexels

Wait until your laundry basket is full 

It can be tempting to wash your clothes as soon as there are a few items in your laundry basket. This, however, will only lead to a constant cycle of laundry. Instead, wait until your laundry basket is full. This will limit the number of times you have to do laundry in a week, or even a month, and is better for the environment. 

Photo by Tima Miroshnichenko from Pexels

Spot clean clothing 

If your garment has a small stain or mark on it, don’t immediately throw it in the laundry, spot clean it first. Use a damp sponge to gently dab at the mark, making sure that you are not rubbing as this can set the stain further into your garment. If you notice that your mark is not lifting, try and use an alternative pre-treatment. Spot cleaning avoids the need to wash your whole garment for the sake of a small stain. 

Photo by Ron Lach from Pexels

Hang towels 

Towels can be used 3 times before needing to be washed. Folding towels whilst they are still damp traps moisture and encourages mould to grow. Instead, hang your towels in an open, airy, space, and allow them to completely dry. This will help to prevent any mould growth and will ensure that your towels can be reused before needing to be washed. 

Photo by Centre for Ageing Better from Pexels

Air clothing 

Sometimes clothing can become slightly musty, especially if they have been folded in a draw or cupboard for an extended period of time. If you notice that your clothing has taken on this stale smell, air them out rather than wash them. Hang your garments outside in the fresh air, or in an open space within your home, and allow your clothing to breathe. As the air wafts through the fibres of your clothes, it will push any bad odours out of the fabric, and leave them smelling fresh and ready to wear. 

Photo by Ron Lach from Pexels

Know how frequently items need to be washed 

Not all of your items need to be washed at the same time. For example, bedding must be washed every two months, whereas jumpers should be washed after every 5 wears. Knowing how frequently each of your washable items needs to be laundered will help you to limit the frequency that you are washing each item, therefore limiting your overall laundry load. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Treat clothes appropriately

Your clothing needs to be treated with care to ensure that it stays in good condition. This means making sure that clothing is neatly folded or hung up when dry, treating stains as soon as possible, and washing each item as stated on its care label. Treating your clothes appropriately will limit how often you need to wash each item, allowing you to spend less time doing your laundry.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Use Laundryheap 

One of the best ways to limit your laundry load is by giving it to Laundryheap to do for you. We are an online, on-demand, laundry service, working around your schedule to deliver your fresh laundry within 24 hours. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to care for your winter warmers

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

It’s going to take more than just a coat to keep you warm this winter. Luckily, your trusty winter warmers are here to help. Just make sure that you look after them by following our handy guide. 

  • Hat
  • Scarf
  • Gloves

Hat 

10% of your body’s heat is lost through your head. Luckily, a warm hat will help prevent this heat from being lost. In winter, the most common type of hat to wear is a beanie, a close-fitting hat that clings to the head and can be worn over the ears. In the autumn and winter seasons, you will find yourself wearing your hat most, if not every, day, so to keep it clean it’s best to wash it 3-5 times each season. 

Machine wash 

Most beanie hats are made from polyester or wool and cotton blends, which are safe to wash in the washing machine. Before machine washing your beanie, first, check the care label. This will tell you if you can wash your hat in the washing machine and, if you can, what temperature and cycle to use. 

To machine wash your beanie, first put it in a laundry bag to prevent it from being snagged in the machine. Next, select a cool wash setting, ideally 30 degrees Celsius, and a gentle cycle. Beanies are made to be stretchy so that they can fit over your head, however, they can stretch in the washing machine and become misshapen. A gentle cycle and cool temperature will help to prevent this from happening. 

Hand wash 

If you are worried about machine washing your beanie, hand wash it instead.

To begin hand washing your beanie, first fill a sink with cool water and add a teaspoon of mild laundry detergent. Submerge your hat in the water, and gently move it around. Make sure that you are not wringing or scrubbing your beanie whilst it’s in the water as this will cause it to stretch. Gently swirl your hat in the water for roughly 5 minutes. If it is heavily stained, allow your hat to sit in the water for 15-30 minutes so that the dirt and oils can break down and be removed. 

After you have washed your beanie remove it from the detergent water and submerge it in fresh, cold, water. Swirl your hat in the fresh water until all of the detergent has been removed- you will need to replenish your water frequently until no more detergent is released. You may be tempted to hold your beanie under a stream of cool water, however, this will only result in it stretching.  

Drying 

Regardless of how you wash your beanie, the drying process is the same. Lay your beanie flat on a clean, dry, towel, and lay another clean, dry, towel over the top of it. Leave your top towel over your beanie for a few minutes to soak up as much excess water as possible, before removing it completely to finish air-drying. Do not wring or twist your beanie to remove water, or use a tumble dryer, as this will stretch and misshapen your hat. Leave your beanie to completely dry before wearing it. 

Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Scarf 

A scarf is perfect for keeping your neck warm whilst you brave the brisk winter day. Most winter scarves are made from cotton, wool, or cashmere as these materials are thick and therefore better at keeping you warm. To ensure that your scarf keeps you warm throughout autumn and winter, wash it 3-5 times per season. 

Machine wash 

Washing machines are too harsh for some materials, such as wool and cashmere, so before washing your winter scarf make sure that it is made from cotton or polyester. 

After checking that your scarf is safe to machine wash, place it in a laundry bag and into your washing machine. The laundry bag will ensure that your scarf doesn’t get snagged whilst being washed. Next, select a gentle and cold water cycle on your machine. Even though your scarf’s material is safe to machine wash, it is still delicate and therefore needs to be washed using a delicate cycle. Finally, add gentle laundry detergent to your machine and begin the wash cycle. Make sure that you are using a gentle laundry detergent as they are softer on fabrics and don’t contain dyes or harsh chemicals

Hand wash 

If your scarf is made from wool, cashmere, or any other delicate material, it must be hand-washed only. 

To begin hand washing your scarf, fill a sink with cold water and add 1 tablespoon of gentle laundry detergent. Completely submerge your scarf in your detergent water and gently swish it around. You may want to gently squeeze each section of your scarf to ensure that it is absorbing as much water as possible. After you have swished your scarf in the water a few times, leave it to sit for 10 minutes, giving it ample time to soak up as much detergent as possible. 

After 10 minutes, remove your scarf from the detergent water and rinse it under a cool running tap. Make sure that your tap is on a low water pressure to avoid any damage to the fibres of your scarf. Avoid wringing or twisting your scarf whilst you are rinsing it as this can also damage its fibres. Continue to rinse your scarf under the cool running tap until no more detergent runs from it. 

Drying 

Unless your winter scarf is made from fleece, you should never use a tumble dryer to dry your scarf. Instead, lay it flat on a clean, dry, towel, and place another clean, dry, towel over the top of it. Gently press down on the top towel to remove as much excess water as possible. After removing as much water as possible, remove the top towel, and leave your scarf to air dry. If your scarf is made from cotton or polyester, you can hang it on a clothes horse or outside to continue air drying

If your scarf is made of fleece, you can dry it on a low heat setting in your tumble dryer. Make sure that you are not using a high heat setting as this will damage the fibres of your scarf. 

Photo by Arina Krasnikova from Pexels

Gloves

When your hands get cold they become stiff and achy, not a particularly pleasant feeling. Gloves keep your hands warm and mobile by insulating them. To ensure that they stay in top shape, wash your gloves roughly 3-5 times each season.   

Machine wash 

Gloves can be made from a variety of different materials, however, cotton or those made with synthetic fibres are the only ones that can be machine washed. Before machine washing your gloves, check their care label to make sure that they are safe to wash in the washing machine. 

To machine wash your gloves, first put them in a laundry bag and then into the washing machine. This will firstly ensure that your gloves don’t get snagged whilst in the machine, and secondly prevent them from getting lost. Next, select a cold and gentle wash cycle that won’t be too abrasive on the fibres of your gloves. Finally, add oxygen bleach to your wash and begin your cycle. Oxygen bleach will help keep the colour of your gloves vibrant, whilst killing any bacteria that may be on your gloves. 

Hand wash 

If your gloves are not made from cotton or synthetic fibres, then you will have to hand wash them. Not all gloves can be hand washed in the same way though. 

Leather and faux leather 

To clean your leather gloves, first use an oil-based soap to remove any stains. Gently rub the soap onto your gloves, paying extra attention to the heavily stained areas, before setting to one side to dry. 

Once your gloves have dried, use a microfiber cloth to polish your gloves. This will help keep them looking shiny. Be careful not to press too hard with your microfiber cloth as this could lead to scratching the leather of your gloves. 

Once you have cleaned the outside of your leather gloves, sprinkle a light dusting of corn-starch or baking soda inside your glove. The powdery particles will absorb any oils and odours inside your gloves, leaving them smelling good as new. Leave your corn-starch or baking soda for 15 minutes, before shaking it out of each glove. 

Wool

To hand-wash your wool gloves, begin by filling a sink with warm water and adding a drop of gentle laundry detergent. Make sure that you are only using a drop of detergent as gloves are reasonably small and don’t require a lot of detergent

Next, submerge your gloves in the detergent water and use a swishing motion to allow the detergent to soak into each glove. Leave your gloves for 10-15 minutes, before draining the detergent water and re-filling the sink with fresh, warm, water. 

Repeat the swishing motion with your gloves, removing all of the detergent from each one. You will have to refill your sink with fresh water each time it becomes too soapy. Once you have removed the detergent from your gloves, drain the water and leave your gloves at the bottom of your empty sink. Using your hands, gently push down on each glove to remove as much excess water as possible. 

Waterproof 

Waterproof gloves are often used for skiing and don’t require much cleaning. To clean your waterproof gloves, generously spray the outside of each glove with alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. This will help disinfect the outside of your gloves. To clean the inside of your gloves, sprinkle either corn-starch or baking soda into each glove and leave it for 15 minutes. The powder will work in the same way as with leather gloves, removing oils and odours. 

Drying 

Regardless of what material your gloves are made from you must avoid using the tumble dryer to dry them. Your waterproof and leather gloves won’t require drying because they have not come into contact with water. 

To dry your cotton and wool gloves place the gloves on a clean, dry, towel and roll the towel up so that the gloves are encased. This will help squeeze any excess water from each glove without causing them to lose their shape. After a few minutes, unroll the towel and rearrange your gloves so that they are lying flat. Leave your gloves in this position to air dry, refraining from wearing them until they are completely dry. 

Photo by Victoria Borodinova from Pexels

The best way to take care of your winter warmers is by letting us take care of them. We can pick up, launder, and have your hats, scarves, and gloves back to you, and ready to wear, within 24 hours. All you have to do is head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your order.


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Pea coat care guide

Photo by MART PRODUCTION from Pexels

As we adjust to the autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our jackets. The best way to ensure that your jacket lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your pea coat care guide

  • Remove lint, pet hair, and debris
  • Make repairs
  • Pre-wash 
  • Pre-treat 
  • Machine wash
  • Hand wash 
  • Dry

Remove lint, pet hair, and debris 

Pea coats, and coats in general, only need to be washed twice a season. To ensure that your pea coat stays in top condition between washes, remove lint, pet hair, and debris once a week. Hang your coat on a hanger, where you can clearly see it. Using a soft-bristled brush, gently brush away any debris that you can see. Then, use a lint brush to remove any lingering lint and/or pet hair. If you don’t own a lint brush, sticky tape works just as well. Make sure that you do both the front and back of your coat, not forgetting the arms as well. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Make repairs 

Rips, tears, and holes can be expected when you’re wearing a coat on a regular basis, especially if you have owned said coat for a number of years. Luckily, pea coats are often made from wool or a similar material, so any damage is easily fixed. Simply sew the damage up using a needle and thread the same colour as your jacket. Small rips and holes don’t require any special sewing skills, however, if the damage is more advanced, you may want to take it to a tailor. It’s always better to get small repairs done on a well-loved coat than buy a new one. 

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood from Pexels

Pre-wash

When the time comes to wash your pea coat, it’s important to make sure that you empty all of your pockets. You don’t want to wash your coat, only to realise that there was a tissue in your pocket that is now stuck to your coat forever. Once you have emptied your pockets, zip-up any zips and fasten any fastenings, except for buttons as this could stretch your pea coat out of shape. After you have made sure that your pockets are emptied and fastened any fastenings, your coat is ready to be washed

Pre-treat

Before you wash your pea coat, check for stains. The most important places to check for stains are the collar and cuffs of your coat. If you do find stains, simply mix a solution of mild laundry detergent and water, and gently rub this directly onto the stain. You can use your fingers or a soft-bristled brush, but be gentle to avoid damaging your coat and setting the stain further into it. Leave your pre-treatment for 15 minutes, giving it ample time to penetrate the stains. After 15 minutes, your coat will be ready to wash

Photo by Brittney Borowski from Pexels

Machine wash 

To machine wash your pea coat, first turn your coat inside out and place it in a laundry bag. This will ensure that your coat isn’t damaged in the washing machine. Set your washing machine to a delicate, cool temperature cycle. Avoid using a hot wash setting as this will damage the delicate fibres of your coat. If your washing machine has a wool-specific setting, use that rather than a delicate cycle. Finally, add a gentle laundry detergent to your machine. Make sure that you are using a gentle laundry detergent as this will dissolve any dirt on your clothing without being too harsh.

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Hand wash 

If you would prefer to hand wash your pea coat, you can do so using cold water and a gentle laundry detergent. Begin the hand washing process by filling a basin with cold water. Make sure that your water is cold and not warm or hot. Once your basin is full, add a small amount of gentle laundry detergent and completely submerge your coat. Use a gentle swishing motion to ensure that your full coat is being penetrated by the laundry detergent. Then, leave it to sit for at least 15 minutes. Once you are satisfied that your pea coat has been adequately washed, rinse it with fresh cold water, making sure that all of the detergent has been removed. After rinsing your coat do not ring it out. Instead, gently squeeze each section of your coat to remove as much excess water as possible. 

Photo by Kindel Media from Pexels

Dry

Regardless of whether you are using a washing machine or hand washing your pea coat, avoid using a tumble dryer. Using a tumble dryer can damage the delicate wool fibres of your pea coat. Instead, lay your coat flat on a clean, dry, towel, on a completely flat surface. You may be tempted to hang your coat up to dry, but this will cause your coat to sag and become misshapen. Laying it on a flat surface ensures that it keeps its shape and the fibres aren’t damaged. It can take a few days for your coat to completely dry, however, it is worth it to ensure that your pea coat stays in the best condition possible. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

If you are worried about washing your pea coat, we’re here to help. Book your coat in for a Laundryheap dry clean by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Puffer jacket care guide

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

As we adjust to the changing autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our jackets. The best way to ensure that your jacket lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your puffer jacket care guide. 

  • Be aware of sharp objects 
  • Pre wash 
  • Machine wash
  • Hand wash
  • Dry on a low heat
  • Air dry
  • Store

Be aware of sharp objects 

Puffer jackets, as the name suggests, have a quilted design made from pockets of insulation that make the sections between the stitching puffy. This insulation makes puffer jackets incredibly warm, but also vulnerable to snags and tears. When wearing your jacket, be mindful of sharp objects that you may come in to contact with. If you do accidentally tear your puffer jacket, re-stuff the area if any insulation has escaped, before using a needle and thread to mend the hole. Make sure that all snags and tears have been mended before you wash your jacket. 

Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Pre wash

Before you wash your puffer jacket it is important to empty all of the pockets and zip up the zipper. This will firstly ensure that you don’t accidentally wash something valuable, and also prevent any unwanted materials, such as tissues, from becoming stuck to your jacket during the washing process. For extra protection, lubricate the zipper with gel to prevent it from rusting and becoming difficult to use. It is also advisable to turn your puffer jacket inside out to avoid the delicate puffy pockets from being snagged and torn during washing.

Photo by Michael Burrows from Pexels

Machine wash

You should never wash your puffer jacket more than twice a year because detergents and washing machines can wear down its water protective shell. If you are using a washing machine to clean your puffer jacket it is best to use a top-loading machine as they don’t have a centre agitator that can catch and tear your jacket. 

The optimum washing machine cycle to use is a gentle cycle. This will limit the amount of times your jacket is spun in the machine, therefore reducing the possibility of your jacket being damaged. 

In terms of laundry detergent, a natural detergent or delicate fabric specific detergent is advised. Using a strong detergent will damage the filler that makes your puffer jacket puffy, resulting in your jacket deflating and becoming less insulating. 

Photo by Boris Pavlikovsky from Pexels

Hand wash

If you are concerned about damaging your puffer jacket in the washing machine, you can hand wash it instead. To hand wash your jacket, first fill a sink or bath with cold water, enough to submerge your jacket in. Next, add a teaspoon of delicate or natural detergent. Finally, submerge your jacket completely in the water, using gentle scrubbing motions to clean each section of your jacket. 

Once you are satisfied that your jacket has been adequately cleaned, rinse it with fresh cold water to ensure that all of the detergent has been removed. Next, lightly squeeze each section of your jacket to remove as much water as possible. Make sure that you are squeezing and not wringing your jacket as this could cause tears. 

Photo by Sinitta Leunen from Pexels

Dry on a low heat 

Despite the delicate fabric your puffer jacket is made from, it is recommended that you tumble dry your jacket. Use a low heat setting and allow your dryer to run until your jacket is completely dry. To ensure that your jacket remains puffy, add 2 tennis balls to your tumble dryer. The movement of the tennis balls in the dryer will redistribute the insulation in your jacket, ensuring that it stays puffy. Although tempting, do not use a high heat setting on your tumble dryer as this can melt the delicate outer shell of your jacket. 

Photo by Viacheslav Stopkevich from Pexels

Air dry 

If you do not have access to a tumble dryer, or you would prefer not to use one, you can air dry your puffer jacket. To air dry your jacket lay it completely flat on a clean dry towel, away from direct sunlight. Leave your jacket to completely dry, before using your hands to redistribute the insulation in your jacket, making it puffy and full bodied. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Store

Most puffer jackets come with handy bags that your jacket can be folded into. Although handy short-term, these bags should not be used to store your jacket for more than a handful of hours. Folding your puffer jacket into a small shape can damage the insulation in your jacket, causing it to be ineffective. Instead, hang your puffer jacket up on a coat hanger in a dry area after every wear. This will ensure that the jackets insulation remains well distributed throughout the pockets, and, if wet, your jacket can completely dry

Photo by Roman Pohorecki from Pexels

The best way to ensure that your puffer jacket lasts throughout the autumn and winter months is to have Laundryheap take care of it for you. To book your Laundryheap order simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Must have laundry products 

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Laundry is one of the worst chores, and yet one of the most important to regularly complete. These must-have laundry products make completing your laundry just that little bit easier. 

  • Laundry detergent 
  • Fabric softener
  • Bicarbonate of soda
  • Oxygen bleach 
  • Chlorine bleach
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Dryer balls
  • Drying rack 
  • Laundry bag
  • Collapsible laundry basket

Laundry detergent 

You can’t do laundry without laundry detergent. Well, you could, but it wouldn’t be as easy. Laundry detergent helps pull away embedded dirt from your laundry and washes it away with water. Detergents come in the forms of powder, liquid, and pods, or you can make your own. Whether you have sensitive skin, want to use a lower temperature, or are trying to tackle tough stains, there is a laundry detergent for you. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Fabric softener

Fabric softener is the perfect accompaniment to your laundry detergent. Although it shouldn’t be used on every item, it helps fight wrinkles, reduces static, and makes laundry soft to the touch. Fabric softener is especially useful for those with irritable skin as it softens the fibres of your laundry, making items smoother against the skin. 

Photo by Liza Summer from Pexels

Baking soda

You may know baking soda as a must have baking product, but it is also a laundry must have. Baking soda is a natural mineral which can be used in several ways throughout the laundry process. For example, mixing 1 cup of baking soda with half a cup of water creates a paste that will lift common stains. Alternatively, adding half a cup of baking soda to your washing machine will help regulate the pH level in the water, allowing your laundry detergent to act more effectively to remove bacteria and dirt. Baking soda can also be used as a natural alternative to fabric softener and to control suds in your washing machine. 

Image by Aqua Mechanical

Oxygen bleach

Oxygen bleach, unlike chlorine bleach, is safe to use on all washable fabrics, except silk, wool, and leather, and can be used on both coloured and white laundry. When oxygen bleach is mixed with water the chemicals in the bleach oxidise and help to lift and remove deeply embedded dirt and stains, whilst brightening the colours of your laundry. You can use oxygen bleach as a pre-treatment or in your washing machine. 

Photo by Brittney Borowski from Pexels

Chlorine bleach

Chlorine bleach has a much stronger bleaching power than oxygen bleach which is why, if you are using it on coloured clothing, you must always test for colourfastness. It is, however, incredibly effective at removing tough stains, disinfecting, and brightening white clothing. Before using chlorine bleach, remember to always water it down as it can be corrosive and cause damage to your laundry and your skin. 

Photo by Nothing Ahead from Pexels

Distilled white vinegar

Much the same as baking soda, distilled white vinegar has many uses in the laundry room. If you have white laundry that’s looking a little grey, distilled white vinegar will get your items back to their original state. Simply add 1 cup of vinegar to a large pot of water and bring it to a boil. Once boiling, remove your watered down vinegar from the heat, add your items, and leave overnight. Wash your laundry as you usually would and be dazzled by how bright your whites have become. In addition to making whites whiter, distilled white vinegar can also be used as an alternative to fabric softener. Add half a cup to your washing machine and it will leave your clothing soft and smelling fresh. 

Image by Mike Mozart

Dryer balls

Drying laundry, even with a tumble dryer, is a hard task. That is why dryer balls are a must have laundry product. Dryer balls are small balls made from wool, plastic, or hard rubber, that reduces static in your laundry and reduces drying times. The balls roll between the layers of your laundry load as the tumble dryer spins, separating each item and allowing air to be evenly distributed throughout your laundry. In addition to this, dryer balls, on average, can be used in up to 1,000 washes, making them environmentally friendly and cost effective. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer

Drying rack

Even if you do have access to a tumble dryer, it’s always handy to have a drying rack. Although they aren’t the fastest way to dry your laundry, drying racks are the most environmentally friendly option. In addition, they come in a variety of shapes and sizes so they can fit any room, and they can be bought incredibly cheaply. If you are looking for a slightly quicker way to dry your clothes, there are heated drying racks available. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Laundry bag 

A laundry bag is perfect for washing your more delicate items, such as underwear or smaller items made of silk or lace. Simply place your items in your laundry bag, and wash them as you usually would. The bag will prevent your clothing from getting snagged in your washing machine, resulting in no expensive items being damaged. In addition to protecting your delicates, laundry bags will also prevent you from losing your socks.

Image by Bill Ward

Collapsible laundry basket 

If you find that laundry takes up a lot of your space, buy a collapsible laundry basket. Although it’s only a small space saver, they are incredibly convenient. Fill your basket with your laundry, and, once it is empty, fold it down and store it away until you need it again. They are easy to use, cost effective, and will save you at least a small amount of space. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

If you are running low on must have laundry products, don’t panic. We are here to help. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your Laundryheap order today.


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DIY Halloween costumes

Photo by Charles Parker from Pexels

Halloween is almost upon us and if you haven’t got your outfit sorted don’t panic. These 4 DIY costumes are easy to make and perfect for a Halloween full of thrills and chills. 

  • Ghost
  • Skeleton
  • Strawberry
  • Zombie bride

Ghost

Let’s start easy. A ghost costume is incredibly easy to achieve, very comfortable, and requires limited supplies. 

To make a ghost costume you will need…
  • A white sheet
  • Scissors 
  • Light coloured hat
  • Pen or pencil
  • Safety pins 
  • Black marker 

To begin making your ghost costume place your light coloured hat on your head. If your hat has a brim you must either cut it off or wear your hat backwards so that it doesn’t get in the way. 

Next, drape your white sheet over your head so that it’s laying evenly over your body. If your sheet is slightly too long, get a friend to use a pen to mark the excess fabric to a comfortable length. Whilst you are still wearing the sheet, get your friend to mark where the top of your head is, and use your fingers to demonstrate where your eyes are, marking them as well. 

Once the appropriate areas have been marked, take your sheet off. Use one safety pin to attach your hat to your sheet using the mark in the centre of the head. Use your remaining safety pins to make sure that the hat is secured to the sheet. 

With your scissors cut eye holes where they were marked. Once you have cut your eye holes, use your black marker to draw around them, making them more defined. You can also use your black maker to draw a nose and mouth if you wish. 

Finally, use your scissors to cut the excess fabric at the bottom of the sheet. For a more ghoulishly looking ghost, cut your fabric in a haphazard manner rather than in a straight line. You are now ready to put your costume on and enjoy a day of tricks and lots of treats. 

Photo by Charles Parker from Pexels

Skeleton 

If you are looking for a costume with a bit more body to it, why not go as a skeleton? 

To make a skeleton costume you will need… 
  • White masking tape 
  • Black clothing to cover your top and bottom half

To begin making your skeleton costume lay out your black clothing on a flat surface. Make sure that your clothes are adequately spread out so that you can see the whole garment. 

Create your skeleton by tearing off strips of masking tape of various lengths and sticking them to your black clothes. Your skeleton doesn’t have to be accurate, so don’t worry too much about getting the lengths and placement of the tape right. Make sure that you have covered the general areas, such as your arms, legs, and torso, before putting your costume on. 

To add to your slinky skeleton look you can paint your face to look like a skeleton using black and white face paint. Alternatively, you can print out a mask of a skeleton for an equally frightening look. 

Photo by Mike Jones from Pexels

Strawberry

Halloween costumes don’t always have to be scary. Go as something sweeter, and easy to make, like a strawberry

To make a strawberry costume you will need… 
  • Red clothing, ideally a dress
  • White felt
  • Long cylinder can (a crisp can will do)
  • Green cardboard
  • Pencil
  • A stretchy headband
  • Scissors 
  • Hot glue gun 

To begin making your strawberry costume, use your scissors to cut out lots of small teardrop shapes from your white felt. To make this step faster, layer 2 or 3 sheets of felt and cut through them at the same time. These teardrop shapes will be the seeds of your strawberry. 

Once you have finished cutting out your shapes, lay out your red clothing on a flat surface, making sure that you can see the whole garment. Using a hot glue gun, glue your felt shapes to your red clothing in a random pattern, making sure that your whole garment is covered. Once you have glued your white felt down, set your red clothing to one side to dry. 

Whilst your clothing is drying, you can make your leafy headpiece. To begin creating your headpiece use a pencil to trace the shape of 2 different sized leaves on your green cardboard. Ideally you want 4 large leaves and 5 or 6 slightly smaller leaves. Once you have drawn all of your leaves, use your scissors to cut them out. To make your strawberry leaves look more realistic, use your fingers to gently pinch the base of each leaf and slide your fingers up to the tip. This will create a gentle curl. 

Your can will be the base of your hat, so make sure that it is a comfortable height to place on your head. Use your glue gun to glue the biggest leaves around the can. Next, use the second biggest leaves to fill in the gaps in between the big leaves, making sure that you can no longer see the can. To finish off your headpiece, stick your headband to your can by making a line of hot glue at the base of your can.

Once your headband is secured you can shimmy your strawberry outfit on, and top it off with your leafy headpiece for more of a treat than a trick. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Zombie bride

We’ve all heard of bridezilla, well this costume is bridezilla if she were dead. Luckily, this outfit is a lot easier to put together than a wedding, so hopefully there won’t be any meltdowns. 

To make a zombie bride costume you will need… 
  • A white dress 
  • White veil (not essential but a nice touch)
  • Moisturiser
  • Light shade of foundation
  • White powder
  • Light blue eyeshadow
  • Smokey eye eyeshadow palette
  • Black pencil eyeliner
  • Black mascara

A zombie bride look is less about the outfit and more about the makeup. That being said, to achieve the bridal look you will need a white dress and a veil. To make your zombie look really come to life, cover your dress in black makeup or any product that will make it look dirty. You may also want to tear the bottom of your dress to zombiefy it. 

To make your zombie bride come alive, begin by smoothing moisturiser into your face. Add the lightest shade of foundation that you can find on top of your moisturiser, blending it in until smooth. Once smooth, add white powder to your face, giving yourself a very pale complexion. To add to the undead look, blend a light blue eyeshadow into your makeup, giving your skin a blueish grey tone.  

Next, use a smokey eye eyeshadow palette to add colour to your eyes, cheeks, and forehead. Use a combination of purple, pink, red, and black eyeshadow underneath your eyes to make dark circles, making sure to blend the colours together with a brush. Use a black eyeshadow to highlight your cheekbones and wrinkles on your forehead, blending the lines slightly to give you a more dead-like look. 

With a black pencil eyeliner, heavily line the lids of your eyes, using your fingers to smudge the eyeliner into your skin. For added effect, use the eyeliner on your lashline, smudging that as well. This will create the effect of sunken eyes.  

Finally, finish the look by applying a heavy amount of mascara to your bottom lashes. Use your mascara brush to clump some of your lashes together, in a messy, haphazard way. 

With your dress on and makeup done, you are ready to head out into the world to find your groom… dead or alive. 

Photo by A Koolshooter from Pexels

At Laundryheap there are no tricks, only treats. Whilst you have fun creating mischief on Halloween, we will pick-up, launder, and redeliver your clothing to you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order today.


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Trench coat care guide

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

As we adjust to the changing autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our coats. The best way to ensure that your coat lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your trench coat care guide

  • Always check the care label 
  • Spot clean
  • Pretreat
  • Machine wash 
  • Dry
  • Keep fresh
  • Store

Always check the care label

As with any item of clothing, before you begin caring for your trench coat you must check the care label. Checking your coats care label will inform you of what fabrics your coat is made from, whether it is safe to machine wash, what temperature you should be washing it at, and whether it is tumble dryer safe. All of this information will help you to care for your trench coat in the appropriate manner. 

Spot clean

Per season you should only be washing your coat 2-3 times. If your trench has a handful of stains, don’t immediately wash it, try and spot clean. To spot clean your trench coat dampen a soft, clean, cloth with diluted vinegar, and gently dab at each stain until it lifts. Avoid rubbing or wiping motions as this can set the stain further into your coat rather than lifting it. You should notice your stains lifting after a handful of dabs, leaving your trench coat clean and ready to wear. 

Photo by Tony Schnagl from Pexels

Pre-treat 

If you have decided that it’s time to wash your trench coat, make sure that you pre-treat any stains before putting it in the washing machine. To pre-treat your stains make a paste from equal parts vinegar and baking soda. Rub this paste into your stains using your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush, and leave it to soak for a minimum of 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, rinse the paste off with lukewarm water. If your stains persist, add two tablespoons of vinegar and two tablespoons of laundry detergent to a bucket of water and leave your trench coat to soak overnight. The mixture will penetrate the stains, lifting them and leaving your trench coat ready for the washing machine. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Machine wash

Even if your trench coat is safe to wash in the washing machine it’s best to take precautions. Before putting your coat in the washing machine turn it inside out and place it in a mesh laundry bag. This will help protect any buttons, zips, and fastenings your trench coat has. Wash your coat on a normal, warm water, cycle, using a gentle laundry detergent. Avoid washing your coat with any other items. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Dry

Once your trench coat has been washed, remove it immediately from the washing machine to limit creasing. You should avoid using your tumble dryer, or any other form of heating, to dry your trench coat, instead opting to air dry. Hang your trench coat on a wooden hanger, making sure that it is sitting on the hanger properly to avoid any stretching, and leave it to air dry in an airy open space. It may take a while for your coat to dry completely, but air drying is the best way to ensure that your coat maintains its shape and is not damaged by heat. 

Photo by Ron Lach from Pexels

Keep fresh

To keep your coat healthy it’s important to freshen it up in between washes. If you own a steam cleaner steaming your trench coat a handful of times between washes will help kill bacteria and remove any creases in your coat. To lift odours, you can spray your trench coat with fabric spray, which is perfect for not only removing smells but giving your coat a quick refresher. The final way to keep your coat looking fresh is by regularly brushing it. Gently run a soft-bristled brush over your coat in between wears to lift lint, hair, and fluff. This will ensure that your coat stays looking pristine and ready to wear at all times. 

Photo by Abdulrhman Elkady from Pexels

Store 

During the autumn and winter months make sure that you hang your trench coat up using a clothes hanger, never on a coat peg. Hanging your trench on a clothes hanger will ensure that it maintains its shape and will not stretch. You may also want to avoid hanging your trench in direct sunlight as this can sometimes make the colour fade. 

When the autumn and winter is over, wash your trench coat one last time, making sure that your pockets are empty, fold it, and store it in a cotton storage bin. This will help keep it fresh and mould free until you need it again next year. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

If you are concerned about washing your trench coat, or your coat is dry clean only, we’re here to help. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.